Divorce means the end of your marital relationship with your spouse, but it does not mean the end of your parental relationship with your children. They require not only individual love and support from each parent but also parents who can co-parent cooperatively. 

In many cases, this is easier said than done. However, your children have a need for peace in their lives, and there are things that you can do to provide it, even if you have to operate alone.

1. Try to see the other side

Divorce makes family situations more complicated, and it is impossible to be completely objective in looking at matters when you are in the middle of them. Nevertheless, try to see things from your co-parent’s perspective. If you are feeling frustrated, chances are that he or she is too.

2. Understand what you can control

You cannot control your co-parent’s behavior, but you can control the way you respond to it. If you can meet frustrating situations with positivity, patience and love, your children will be the better for it.

3. Prepare yourself to take up the slack

Even if your co-parent is not living up to his or her responsibilities, you still have to live up to yours. You may rightfully think this is unfair. However, in this situation, fairness is less important than your children’s well-being.

4. Seek out helpful resources

There are many resources available to assist divorced parents navigating the co-parenting process: 

  • Books 
  • Blogs 
  • Counseling 
  • Support from family and friends 
  • Conversation with other divorced parents 

Whatever you are going through, you are not alone in facing it.

5. Keep sight of what is important

Remember why you are going to all this trouble in the first place. It is for the sake of your children. They need you to do for them what they cannot, and they are worth the extra effort.