Co-parenting, while not for everyone, is the best way to offer stability and emotional comfort for children after a divorce. Of course, in situations that involve physical, drug, or alcohol abuse it is not always the best option.

Where both spouses are stable, invested in the children, and committed to keeping their best interests in mind, co-parenting is a wonderful solution for everyone involved. As such, it is becoming more and more common among divorced couples.

There are some indicators of how well a co-parenting scenario will play out for a family. Below are some good questions to ask yourself when considering this option:

Are both spouses willing to put forth the effort?

Are they able to communicate respectfully and effectively every time they speak?

Do both spouses have an equally stable, loving, and supportive relationship with the children?

Are current boyfriend/girlfriend/spouses in agreement with a co-parenting relationship that will involve a great deal of communication between exes?

Is it in the best interests of the children for both parents to continue making decisions together and putting on a united front? Will they understand and would it be what they wanted?

Believe it or not, there are several families who still spend holidays and vacation time together after a divorce, including bringing along their new families. This is possible when two mature adults make a continuous, conscious decision that the children matter above all else. Ex-spouses who can commit to this level of co-parenting can even find themselves becoming best friends again. It is a win-win situation for everyone!